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Published in OUR BLOG
Tuesday, 08 November 2016 23:18

Fondaco dei Tedeschi - what do you mean?

T Fondaco dei tedeschi is a endless source of surprise. The terrace suspended over the Rialto roofs and dominating the city is a breathtaking viewpoint. From here is possible to see far across the Venetian lagoon even to the peaks of the nearby Italian Alps. This unique panoramic view will win the hearts of all those who love Venice !

fondaco tedeschi www.freewalkinvenice.org FREE WALK IN VENICE tours. jpg

The building, renovated by Rem Koolhaas, celebrates the traditional elements, textures and shapes of Venice where in the past we had the historical Fondaco dei Tedeschi. Nowadays this is a new luxury department store and a cultural hub for Venice, promoting events and exhibitions.

 

 

 

This and many other suggestions during our Free Walk in Venice tours. Join us !

Published in OUR BLOG
Tuesday, 08 November 2016 20:48

The clock of San Geremia

In Venice the life of the city found in the clock an irreplaceable controller of the hundreds of activities taking place.

The Venetian Governament's decision to assign to the clock of San Geremia, alongside that of San marco (construction of which was completed in 911), that of the Frari (erected from 1361 to 1396) and that of San Francesco della Vigna (completely rebuilt, ending in 1581), the task od advising with strokes of their bells when the Maggior Consiglio, that is to say the highest political body of the Republic of Venice was going to meet was of enormous importance. Gradually the citizens (about one hundred thousand people) learnt to appreciate how handy it was to associate the division of time as tolled by the bells with the rhythm of their working day.

 

Do you want to learn more? Join our Magnificent northern side of Venice and Jewish Ghetto tour! :)

 

 

san geremia church www.freewalkinvenice.org

Published in OUR BLOG
Wednesday, 02 November 2016 19:07

Coffee in Venice!

Do you like the Italian coffee "espresso"?

Europeans got their first taste of coffee in 1615 when Venetian merchants who had become acquainted with the drink in Istanbul carried it back with them to Venice. Venetian merchants followed the sea routes that linked the far east with Venice and Naples, bringing the first bags of coffee in their city. At first, the beverage was sold on the street by lemonade vendors, but in 1645 the first coffeehouse opened in Italy. Coffeehouse soon sprang up all over the country and they become a platform for people, especially artists and students to come together and chat…then it is certain that Venice was the first place in Italy where people experienced the delicious aroma of coffee! Historical documents revealed that the ambassador in Costantinople Gianfrancesco Morosini was the first to mention the coffee in a report to the senate of Venice in 1585. Some ancient papers testify that in Venice the coffee was very expensive and considered a valuable medicine (prepared as infusion with powder of roasted coffee beans). Towards the end of the century, the infusion of coffee became so popular and required by the people, and the senate issued a special order and it procured and imported larger quantities of coffee for the city of Venice.

 

The first coffee shop was opened by Turkish traders in Saint Mark’s square under the Procuratie Nuove.  Given the success in a short time it opened more than 200 coffee shop throughout the city. In 1720 was opened the CAFÉ’ FLORIAN , which boasted a long line of illustrious clients, such as: Giacomo Casanova, Carlo Goldoni and Lord Byron. Equally important are two other historic coffee in Saint Mark’s square: CAFFE’ QUADRI and CAFFE’ LAVENA , the first opened in 1775 and the second in 1750.

 

 

If you want to discover more about the daily life in Venice book your free tour by Isola Tour , the original Free Walk in Venice! :)

 

Enjoy a hot cup of coffee!

Published in OUR BLOG

Free Walk in Venice is just the first project of the Isola Tour non-profit Association, officially registered in 2014 by Venice lovers and professionals in the tourism sector as well as cultural and heritage managers.

We help our guest and supporters of our Association to know the real and hidden Venice that we love..through the original free tours of Venice!

We are friendly, greeters and passionate ambassadors of the city, and we’ll help you to discover the most amazing spots, beautiful areas faraway from the tourist ones.

We believe in fairness and our mission is to make you feel at ease during your stay.

This is why we promote only Venetian cuisine giving you the best tips about it and providing information about the best ways to transportation and to choose tickets to museum and various attractions.

We don’t believe in boredom and this is why we love interaction and exchange with our guests for a nice and relaxing walk speaking about the most curious and hidden aspects of the city.


OUR GOALS ARE:
- Supporting the promotion of tourism and sightseeing.
- The development of contacts and cooperation between people.
- Helping people to save money and time during their stay

 

Do you want to know people coming from different parts of the world, discovering the real hidden Venice? Wear your best smile and join FREE WALK IN VENICE, our Venice free tour ! - English activities Everyday - italiano su richiesta per gruppi - www.freewalkinvenice.org

 

freewalkinvenice by isolatour_ fondaco

Published in OUR BLOG
Monday, 29 August 2016 07:03

Take care of our Venice!

 

 

Important advice for tourists



Venice is a city utterly over-run by tourists. But Venice is also home to thousands of people going about their everyday business (and they're not all dependent on tourists for their livelihoods). So visitors should bear in mind that that is what they are - visitors - and make an effort to behave appropriately.

Plaintive little pleas from the council are plastered around the tourist sights urging tourists to behave with decorum. There is even a new awareness-raising 'decorum week' with a parade of boats down the Grand Canal. And the threat of fines for picnickers and bare-chested men. I won't advise you not to drop litter; that goes without saying. But some local 'rules' of behaviour are less obvious so I've done my best to come up with some advice that will help you to give tourists a good name.

Walk on the right

This is the norm in Italy, and in several other countries too. Visitors from the UK, where we favour freestyle walking, can take a long time to tumble to this. In Venice, where the narrow lanes are thoroughfares used by all, tourists and busy locals, this is absolutely vital. You should keep to the right, always allowing room for others to pass (stick to single file when necessary). Keep to a brisk pace on busy paths. If you want to stop to look in a shop window or consult your map, pull in, removing yourself from the stream of traffic just as you would if you were driving. Spare a few moments to imagine what it must be like for those who have to take these tourist routes every day to get to their office or run urgent errands.

Don't block bridges and don't picnic

On a similar note, don't obstruct bridges. If you must stop on a narrow bridge to admire the view (and in picturesque areas, it's hard not to), keep out of the way and don't cause a traffic jam. Do not sit on bridges to eat your lunch unless you want to infuriate hundreds of passers-by. Public picnicking, incidentally, is frowned on in general and in some areas it's banned. From time to time the police threaten to fine people attempting to eat in public places around St. Mark's Square; I've seen picnickers being moved on. Try to find an out-of-the-way spot where you can sit decorously on a bench.

Boat etiquette

And next, be considerate on boats. Venice's ferries get very crowded. Boatmen will often urge passengers to move forwards ('avanti!') and to find space inside the boat. Tourists who hang around near the gangplanks will prevent other passengers from getting on and off, and will win themselves no friends. Don't be too worried about getting through the crowds when you reach your stop. Once your ferry has moved off from the preceding stop, head for the exit, uttering a firm 'permesso' when you need to pass someone. Take off your rucksack when you're on a boat.

Dress decently

This is necessary if you want to enter churches or monuments. Women and men should basically be covered from the collar-bone to the knee, or as near as possible. Shorts and bare shoulders will give offence and may result in you being barred from religious sites, though a scarf or sarong can save the day. I've seen tourists with sleeveless tops turned away after queuing at St. Mark's.

Don't dress for the seaside. If you're visiting the beaches at the Lido, by all means (un)dress appropriately. But away from the sea, Italian men do not go bare-chested, and both men and women tend to cover themselves up more than the British or Americans. (Women often dress provocatively but not in a whole-expanse-of-skin way like Anglo-Saxons). Some Italian towns are so offended by scantily-clad tourists that they have introduced by-laws banning bikinis and bare chests on the streets. Venice joined them in 2007: men - if you go bare-chested you will offend other people and you could get hit by a big fine.

Be polite

It’s only good manners to learn a few phrases in Italian - at the very least, you should master 'please', 'thank you' and 'do you speak English?'. 

 

Thank you : Italy Heaven

 

 

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