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Il blog dei nostri Venice free tours.

 

La Serenissiam è stata definita la miglior forma di Repubblica esistente, + anche vero che la giustizia qui a Venezia era molto severa, anche se dava,(specialmente dopo l’episodio del famoso fornaretto) garanzie precise per quanto poteva riguardare la difesa degli accusati di crimini.

Ma crimini efferati ve ne furono, e proprio nella natura stessa della Repubblica questi dovevano essere immediatamente puniti con precisa e mirata violenza, per dare al popolo la sicurezza e il monito che chiunque si macchiasse di cruenti crimini veniva puntualmente punito, dando soddisfazione alle vittime o ai loro parenti, ma , in egual modo, far presente che la lunga mano della quarantia criminal sarebbe stata presente, e la punizione inesorabile e terribile.

L’esecuzione  dei condannati a morte avveniva sempre tra le colonne di Marco e Todaro a S. Marco, ma prima, perchè l’impatto “educativo” fosse ancor più efficace, il colpevole doveva subire determinati, terribili torture.

colonna di s.croceUna delle tappe più drammatiche avveniva, dopo il trasporto in una gondola sul canal grande dalle prigioni venivano portati a S. Croce, presso una colonna unica rimasta di un Monastero che aveva sede alla Giudecca e che venne smantellato, e che venne quindi incastrata tra la Fondamenta della Croce e la Fondamenta del Monastero.

Fondamenta de la CroceQui venivano loro mozzate le mani che venivano poi legate al collo, quindi il condannato veniva portato presso il luogo  dell’esecuzione, e qui, finalmente veniva posta fine alla sua vita, con lo sguardo rivolto all’orologio della torre, giusto per far capire loro che quella era l’ora della loro morte. Si ricorda difatti il detto "Te fasso veder mi, che ora che xe"!

Sicuramente fortemente cruento e drammatico, ma questo era ritenuto  un modo per rendere la giustizia più giusta Colonne di Marco e Todaro(all’epoca) e allo stesso tempo dare un insegnamento ai veneziani del peso della legge! Da non dimenticare!

Free Walk in Venice tour ! Venice is a small, pedestrian-friendly city (remember, we don't have cars and it's forbidden ride a bike - for adults). If you're willing to walk or if you decide to  buy a 12-24 or 48 hours vaporetto pass, you can easily get around on your own. 

Join our guided tour :) it  can be worthwhile if you're pressed for time or if you want to discover something different from a local point of view and for sure  if you want to learn more about Venice than you could learn from a guidebook! :)

 

 

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Repost from la Biennale website

 

The 74th Venice International Film Festival, organized by La Biennale di Venezia, will run at Venice Lido from August 30th to September 9th, 2017, directed by Alberto Barbera. The Festival is officially recognised by the FIAPF (International Federation of Film Producers Association).

The aim of the Festival is to raise awareness and promote the various aspects of international cinema in all its forms: as art, entertainment and as an industry, in a spirit of freedom and dialogue. The Festival also organises retrospectives and tributes to major figures as a contribution towards a better understanding of the history of cinema.

 

The Venice Biennale has been for over 120 years one of the most prestigious cultural institutions in the world. Established in 1895, the Biennale has an attendance today of over 500,000 visitors at the Art Exhibition. The history of the La Biennale di Venezia dates back from 1895, when the first International Art Exhibition was organized. In the 1930s new festivals were born: Music, Cinema, and Theatre (the Venice Film Festival in 1932 was the first film festival in history). In 1980 the first International Architecture Exhibition took place, and in 1999 Dance made its debut at La Biennale.

 

Here below the link to the program:

http://www.labiennale.org/en/cinema/2017/program-cinema-2017?date=2017-08-30

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The Grand Canal, Venice's magnificent water street is also called the “Canalazzo“. This is one of the real canals of Venice and it is the most important water way of Venice. Its lenght is about 3800 meters and it splits the city in two sides, "de citra" and "de utra".

You know, Venice looks like a fish, not bad for a city on the lagoon! The Grand Canal it's like a thick dark line that creates a kind of "big S" inside the fish.

By each sideof the Grand Canal you can see  many different and magnificent palazzi (from a period dated between XII and XVII century) that testify the richness and beauty of the art during  the “Serenissima“ Republic.

The Grand Canal  was the centre of the trades of the Republic since the Middle Age. Here ships (some were over 400 tons) used to sail by: in fact, it is right on the Grand Canal that the “Fondaci” were born. They were a sort of big warehouses and inns for merchants coming from every part of the world. One if this fondaci is: Fondaco dei Tedeschi, now houses luxury shops but..also a magnificent terrace where you can enjoy one of the best view of Venice!

There are 4 bridges crossing the Grand Canal, each built in different eras. The most recent one is the “Ponte della Costituzione” (the Constitution Bridge), known also as the “Calatrava Bridge” (from the name of the Spanish Architect who presented the project) and inaugurated on September  11th 2008. It links the Santa LuciaTrain Station with Piazzale Roma (bus station). Right after it, there is the “Ponte degli Scalzi ("Barefoot Bridge") . Proceeding towards Saint Mark's Square we find the Rialto Bridge, certainly the most famous one, once made of wood "Ponte delle monete". It used to be a drawbridge that allowed the crossing of the canal to sailing ships, when Rialto was the ancient port of the city. The last bridge we meet is the Accademia Bridge, still a temporary structure made out of wood. It is a very important link between Dorsoduro area (and the Accademia museum) and Saint Mark's district.

These four bridges are not the only way to cross the Canal Grande: a quite cheap gondola our public ferry - traghetto) service takes people, tourists and locals, from one side to the other.

The Grand Canal ends in Saint Mark's where the spectacular view of the basin opens wide in front of us. On the right side the Salute church and the “Punta della Dogana” (Custom Point),on the left the extraordinary view of Saint Marks’ Square, the Doge's Palace, the Basilica, and the dominating belltower, our  so called “El paron de Casa”.

The Grand Canal was, and still is, the most ambitious place to live. All palaces on this water way (no pedestrian access from the Canal) were built and embellished by the most important nobles families of the City. The best way (the only one !!) to see all the palaces is by water bus: sit back, relax and enjoy the splendour passing by!

If you want more tips related to the Grand Canal your our free tour, for a local point of view! :)

During our Free Walk in Venice tours we always repeat that Venice, because of its uniqueness, is a fragile city.
The increasing number of travellers who walk every day along its calli makes it necessary to remember some rules to be respected by all visitors. This way, discovering the city will be easier, respecting Venice itself and its citizens!

Thank you !

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Rialto Market and the lenght fish

As everyone knows, Rialto was and is still the commercial heart of our beautiful Venice. Even today in this area you can see the main markets with fresh fish and fruits and vegetables that are bearing the morning by boat. What a wonderful experience to be there early morning! The best of themselves the Rialto offers before the opening, where you can find the best bargains in action seeing the skilled tradesmen.

These markets are open all week (fish market is close on Sundays ans Mondays), always crowded first of all with  Venetians...and tourists. 

The fish market is open from Tuesday to Saturday  from 7.30 to  about 12, while that of fruits and vegetables is open from 7.30 to about 13.30.

 The most fish stalls is in two buildings with a view of the Grand Canal, in the Campo del pesce (campo of the fish).

A close area, the so called Erberia, however, is the right area where you can find the fruit and vegetable market. It offers an interesting walk through colorful fresh fruits and vegetables.

These markets were built in neo-Gothic style in 1907 as a replacement of the metal roofing from the nineteenth century. The fish market has been here for almost a thousand years. Let you know that that the Republic of Venice regulated since 1173 the sale of fish with a special edict which laid down the rules for the trade. La Serenissima was particularly severe with fish vendors selling undersized fish.

Already in 1173 an edict of the Republic of Venice informed consumers on the minimum size of the fish one should buy, imposing precise and strict rules. Today at the Rialto fish market one can still see a white marble table. It indicates the minimum length allowed for the sale of fish, in particular about the catch of some species of fish in order to preserve their growth: from the 12 centimetres of the bass ( keep in mind that today they have become 25 centimetres) to the 3 for mussels (in Venice called peoci).

 

 Rialto market white marble table indicating the minimum length allowed for the sale of fish Free Walk in venice tours Isola Tour

Good to know that already 900 years ago fishermen were questioning the legitimacy of some fishing. Why? Because  the minimum length of the different species of fish can influence the destiny of the sea’s population. And this is  the objective of the Decree 1967/2006, also known as the “Mediterranean Decree”.

 

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Here our Veronica at the Rialto market during the heart and soul of Venice tour by Isola Tour. Join our Free Walk in Venice!

 

 

Free Walk in Venice

by Isola Tour association

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Gondole for everyone !

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Gondola, Venice

The venetian Gondola was  the main type of transportation for Venetians, even outside the city..we can say  until the invention of motorboats. But that was in particular for very rich people, a kind of limousine ;)

First mentioning of gondola was in the far 1094. That was a very important year, it was the same year when St. Mark’s Church (Basilica di San marco) was consecrated.

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Ancient gondola in Ca' Rezzonico museum

 

 

 

It is 11 metres long, made up of 280 different pieces of wood and is painted with seven layers of black paint. It can be steered by a single gondolier with just one oar!

 

 

What about colours?

At the beginning you could decorate and paint your gondola however you wanted. Didn't you know that? We don't think you knew that because the typical gondola nowadays is a black gondola!

Hovever, wealthy noble and rich families could even risk bankruptcy in order to maintain their appearances and have colourful and unique gondolas. So they kept on to decorate their gondole.

Back in the past, gondolas were covered up with a wooden cabin called felze.

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Gondole represented by Gentile Bellini in the early 1500’s, Gallerie dell'Accademia museum,Venice

 

The Venetian Senate ended this extravagance mood of decorating trought a law to  evem ban decorations and to make all gondolas black... gondole that everyone knows.

Today Venetian people are not using gondolas anymore.. but tourists can take a gondola ride pretty much anywhere in the city. The price is fixed, it’s 80 € for 30 minutes during the day and 100 € during the night. 

There are also wedding gondolas…

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A gondola decorated for a wedding

… or funeral gondolas.

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 18th century funeral gondola in Venice

But the ones we are still using and that we love  the most is the so called "traghetto". Traghetto means "ferry boat", a public service across Grand Canal.  The faster way to cross it! This is a very cheap service, just 2€! Of course this will last only few minutes, but that’s the way locals doa. and finally you can share a gondola with Venetian people.

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People getting on a traghetto "ferry boat" at Rialto market, Venice

 

By Free Walk in Venice

Isola Tour project

4 meeting point, unlimited knowledge and fun for our Venice free tours.

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Curious remarks in Venice: Palazzo Grimani di San Luca

 

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This palace was built in the mid-16th century for the procurator Gerolamo Grimani by the architect Nichele Sanmicheli and completed after his death by the architect Gian Giacomo de' Grigi, known as the Bergamasco.

A legend connects these large openings to an episode rekating to a young Grimani. The young man wanted to marry a young lady of the Tiepolo family, so he asked for her hand, receiving this reply from her father:

"It shall never be said true that I gave the hand of my daughter to a desperate man that has no palace on the (Grand) Canal".

At that, young Grimani promiused that he would have built a house with windows larger that the doorway of Ca' Tiepolo, and so it was.

 

Did you like this curiosity? Join Free Walk in Venice and our tours will help you to discover more and more !

 

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Where? San Marco, fondamenta della Chiesa 4041

Vaporetto waterbus stop: 1-2-N  RIALTO

 

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The Scuola Grande di San rocco is one of the six Scuole Grandi that have been in the city for centuries.

It started in 1478 to help poors and sicks, especially during outbreaks of the plague. 

San Rocco, or St. Rock (1296-1327), was born in France and spent his life looking after palgue sufferers. It is said that during his stay in Piacenza he too became ill yet managed to survive. Hovewer, when he returned home he was so thin and looked so terrible that nobody recognised him and he was imprisoned, Only his faithful dog kept him company. This is why St. Rock is often represented with a small dog. In 1485 his body was moved to Venice and he became one of the protectors of the city, His feast day is still celebrated on August 16th every year and the "tendon del doge", a sort of large canopy, is erected in the campo. 

The Scuola di San Rocco was built between 1489 and 1549, but its present look is the result of alterations that have taken place over the years. 

When the building was completed, the brothers lauched a competition to find a painter to decorate the rooms. The participants had to submit a sketch (a rough outline of the general idea) of St. Rock acending into heaven.

He submitted a finished painting claiming that it was his way of making a sketch and, to cap it all, he gave the paiting to the school as a present. Needless to say, he won teh competition!

 

Free Walk in Venice by Isola Tour loves the Scuola Grande di San Rocco. 

 

 

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Discover Dorsoduro, Venice - The Pugni Bridge !

Departing from Campo San Barnaba, turn left. After a short walk along fondamenta Gerardini, you will come to the "barca", a floating fruits and vegetable shop.

But let's talk about the Pugni bridge. In the past, until 1705, the citizens of Venice were divided into two different factions, the Castellani (those who lived in the Castello, St. Mark - San Marco and Dorsoduro zones) and the Nicolotti (who lived in the Cannaregio, San Polo and Santa Croce areas).

Clashes were frequent and often took place on the city's bridge. These fights, which at times involved hundreds of people, were not repressed or punished by the government, who merely decided the rules. The congflicts could only take place between September and Christmas and they followed a precise set of rules. Once the challenge had been made, referees were chosen, as was the bridge where the fight would take place. On the chosen day, each faction would arrive to a roll of drums and the sounding of trumpets and would present its champion who either fought alone or in small groups.

The real war only began after this. It consisted of a gigantic free-for-all with hundreds of men battling to get to and claim the centre of the bridge.

Fisticuffs were allowed and, until 1574, sticks too. These were sharp people died. The picture you found on the bridge is the shape of a foot which marked teh contestant's startimg point.

 

 

Do you want to know more our beautiful Venice? Join our free walk !

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